Tuam

You should have been cherished.

You should have been loved.

You should have been held.

You should have been warm.

You should have been told every day how wonderful.

How beautiful.

How unique.

How perfect.

You were.

You should have been told that there was never anyone else

That you were the first one like you.

The only one that had ever been

That would ever be.

You.

You should have danced every day.

And caught a smile every morning.

And ran in the rain like a wild one.

And lay in the sun and kicked the clouds.

You should have not have been made a thing in your own country.

Filth.

Broken

Nothing.

We did not love you.

We did not cherish you.

We’re breaking now.

We’re buried with you.

We’re sorry.

We’re sorry.

We’re sorry.

You should have been cherished.

 

13 comments

  1. Beautiful words, mouse. Let’s hope the poor souls are at peace now. And look to making sure atrocities like this never happen again.

  2. Thank you for sharing your poem with us, Mouse.

    I had heard about Tuam Home before but I hadn’t heard about the most recent discoveries about the bodies found there. Horrifying and sickening are the only words that come to mind.

  3. There is a documentary called “Children of Shame” from 2016 available on Amazon that is free with amazon prime that was filmed before the burial chambers were opened. The documentary interviews individuals that lived in Tuam and other children’s homes, explains the history which led to the institutions. The reaction of the Bon Secours Sisters was shocking and cold.

  4. I don’t know what to say. There are no words for how awful this is.

    Out of morbid curiosity, did this happen because the nuns wanted to kill the children, or were they just that shitty at being caretakers? Not that I can understand how they slept at night either way.

  5. Beautiful poem. Everything I’ve read about Tuam made my heart break. From the way the children who lived there were treated in school to the neglect and complete disregard for the lives in the care of that home. It made me angry and incredibly sad for the children (now adults) who survived and still have memories. The mental and physical damage done, living in such a place and being told they were bad and shameful because of how they were conceived…it would be a very hard thing for me to to forgive if I were in their shoes.

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